Pollution by Parkham Farms


The History of Convictions
Jan 2005 Mr Willes was ordered to pay £4,000 costs and given a 12 month conditional discharge for offences under Regulations 3 and 7 of the Medicines (Restriction on the Administration of Veterinary Medicinal Products) Regulations 1994.

This was as result of investigations by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate and Ireland’s Department of Agriculture which seized a number of illegal veterinary medicines from Sedborough Farm in Aug 2003.

Oct 2005 Parkham Farms fined £500 and ordered to pay £1,119 costs for offences under Water Resources Act 1991.

Pollution of a stream with liquid waste at Higher Alminstone.

Environment Agency: "The stream at Alminstone Cross ran white with the surplus effluent. There was also sewage fungus on the bottom of the stream for around 800 metres, which showed there had been a problem for some time."

Nov 2008 Parkham Farms fined £6,700 and ordered to pay £2,583 costs for offences under Water Resources Act 1991.

Pollution of a stream with liquid waste at Higher Alminstone.

Environment Agency: "More than two kilometres of an important tributary of the River Torridge were polluted as a result of this incident that was one of the worst we've seen for some time. Milk waste can be very harmful when it enters rivers and streams because it strips the water of oxygen causing fish to suffocate. While we managed to recover more than 70 dead trout and coarse fish, the total number killed would have been considerably higher."

Apr 2011 Mr Willes fined £19,500 and ordered to pay £4,190 costs offences under Water Resources Act 1991.

Three separate offences:
1. Allowing controlled waste to be deposited without a permit (including plastics, a fridge, tyres, light bulbs, etc)
2. Causing slurry and milk to enter a stream.
3. Allowing effluent into a further stream.

Environment Agency: "No drainage survey was carried out when the dairy was expanded to identify risks and to divert water polluted with cattle faeces to the slurry tank. In addition, an enormous silage store had been built without complying with the guidelines. This had resulted in prolonged discharges of silage effluent and slurry to two separate streams, both of which were extensively affected."

Jul 2015 Mr Willes fined £4,280 and Parkham Farms £22,620 for offences under Water Resources Act 1991.

Three separate offences:
1. Polluting a stream with slurry by spreading slurry just before heavy rain.
2. Diverting a water course by constructing a dam in a stream at Beckland Farm and pumping water from the stream into a reservoir.
3. Allowing waste from Parkham Farms cheese factory to be spread onto land in breach of a condition of its Environmental Permit.

Environment Agency: "Slurry and farm washings can kill fish and other aquatic life by adding toxic pollutants and stripping oxygen from the water. It is therefore important farmers make every effort to ensure these farm wastes do not escape into our rivers and streams.Farmers should maximise the use of slurry as fertiliser, ensure that slurry lagoons are empty by the start of winter and also have spare capacity for emergencies."